Wholly Guacamole!

photo 5

Most Embarassing Moment

In a recent ice-breaker activity in a work-group event, (don’t you just hate those? Why are we, as adults, find ourselves forced into these ridiculous situations? If we wanted to socialize, aren’t we developed enough to summon the brain power to verbalize sentences in the form of communication with another human being? Good lord.) I was asked what my most embarrassing moment was. I had to commend the ring leader of this activity, that was quite a risk to take: what if someone, feeling obliged to participate, conjured up some horrific memory of being hazed during Freshman Lacrosse Camp, being forced to strip down to their underwear in and sing “I’m a Little Teapot” in the quad during the lunch hour? No, I am not speaking from experience. I can’t play lacrosse to save my life.

I really had to think about this though… the blessing and the curse that I bear (more a curse to those close to me) is that I really don’t embarrass easily. I am the moron that you catch belting out “Let it Go” walking down Newbury Street in the middle of a Saturday because it’s stuck in my head. I’m the gal who makes up different dances according to which aisle of Wegmans I find myself in. I was the kid who wound up in the emergency room needing stitches because I just had to win at Shopping Cart Showdown (also a great Wegmans pastime).

Sure, I have lots of memories that make me instantly face-palm, but I know that those moments of idiocy just make me who I am. The one moment I never lived down, and my answer, was the time I was invited to a gathering: it was a pot-luck, and I did not know that until I arrived there, empty-handed. Not only did I break the Cardinal Rule (and my mother’s) of always bringing something to a party, but I was the only person without a dish to pass. All evening, I had to dodge questions about my lack of a dish. It was mortifying, and I couldn’t wait to get out of there. Big deal, right? I’ve done things way worse than that; however, it was not like me, and therefore just felt so terrible.

So, lesson learned: always have something. My suggestion? Make something that is easy on you, and an easy crowd pleaser: guacamole. I will bet you can count on one hand the number of folks you know who don’t enjoy this nutricious and delicious snack. And with my go-to recipe that I have for you below, I can pretty much guarantee that you’ll never be scrambling for what to make your guests.

IMPORTANT TIP: I have been asked a lot about how to keep guac from browning, which occurs when oxygen takes its toll on your beautiful snack. After playing around with different methods to keep homemade guacamole as fresh as the moment it was poured from the food processor, I have found my fail-safe solution: a layer of water on the top of the guac. See the recipe below for directions. 

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Holy Guacamole!

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Time: 10 min
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Materials:

  • Food processor
  • Measuring spoons
  • Cutting board and knife

Ingredients:

  • 3-4 Haas ripe avocados roughly cubed
  • ¼ c fresh cilantro leaves (stems removed), roughly chopped
  • Juice from 1 lime (about ¼ c)
  • ½ chopped red onion
  • 2T garlic
  • 2tsp salt
  • 2tsp black pepper
  • 1T cayenne pepper sauce, such as Franks Red Hot ® (optional, but delicious)
  • 1 diced tomato (optional)

Directions:

  1. Add onion and cilantro to food processor.  photo 2 Pulse for 3-5 seconds, until well blended. Scrape down sides with a rubber spatula.  
  2. Add your avocado, lime juice, garlic, salt, and pepper. Pulse until just well mixed (do not overblend!).
  3. Add in your hot sauce, and pulse two to three times.
  4. Pour into a serving dish with your rubber spatula. photo 3
  5. Add diced tomatoes and gently fold into your mixture. Enjoy with pita chips or tortilla chips.  photo 4

TIP: If you are not going to serve your guacamole immediately, place your guac in an airtight container. Pat down your mixture with a rubber spatula or the back of a spoon, to get rid of air pockets. Before placing the lid on, gently pour a thin layer (about 1/8-inch) of water. Pour out water, and stir guac before serving. Enjoy!

 

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